What Brands Want

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Transcript - May 1 2018

00:03

and actually Eric made a really nice

00:05

incidental or accident or maybe it was

00:07

the great planning by the Amidah team

00:09

here a nice segue sort of the comments

00:11

he was making at the end about what you

00:13

can do for your brands and how they're

00:14

thinking about this industry and how

00:16

advertising is changing so what I wanted

00:18

to do is talk to you a little bit about

00:19

what brands are thinking about how

00:21

they're planning their strategies how

00:23

they're investing their money and why

00:25

that's actually super relevant both as

00:27

an opportunity and a threat to you as a

00:29

publisher so in the interest of time I'm

00:32

just gonna I have one hundred and

00:33

fifty-five slides they're all in ten

00:35

point font and we're gonna just no

00:37

questions no nothing until the very end

00:38

I'm just kidding chiming with any

00:40

questions you may have and we'll dive

00:42

right in so really what we're gonna talk

00:45

about today is publishing from the brand

00:47

perspective the currency of advertising

00:49

is fundamentally shifted I think we all

00:51

know that behaviors consumer behaviors

00:53

have changed and a lot of publishers are

00:55

kind of scrambling trying to figure out

00:56

how do I continue to grow my audience

00:57

grow my revenue and be more relevant

00:59

despite the sea changes that we're all

01:01

sort of treading water and/or drowning

01:02

in some of us are swimming so really the

01:05

the agenda is one how we got here a

01:07

brief history of the attention economy

01:09

how brands are responding so big changes

01:11

in their approaches to advertising and

01:13

how they spend their budget and how they

01:14

spend their time and how they think

01:16

about you know publishers then also what

01:18

publishers can do and I agree with Eric

01:20

when he was saying at the end was really

01:22

getting me the give me the chills

01:23

getting me really excited because I

01:24

believe that publishers are special and

01:26

meaningful and important to our society

01:28

I think that publishers have the

01:30

god-given right to go out and earn some

01:31

of these dollars that platforms are

01:33

taking away so what I hope I leave you

01:35

with today is a little bit of a formula

01:36

a little bit of a call to arms to go out

01:38

and get some of that revenue because

01:40

there's a huge opportunity for

01:41

publishers to leapfrog their own their

01:44

own market and do some really special

01:45

things

01:46

thanks to those changes in advertising

01:47

which feel like really really scary

01:48

things so my name is Andrew and I'm from

01:52

Reve made we are a company that just

01:54

turned two years old last April and what

01:57

we do is cool animations in PowerPoint

01:59

now we we helped rands develop their

02:01

audiences so we worked elect directly

02:03

with brands so Eric was talking about

02:04

all the things that brands can't do that

02:06

they're trying to do we helped them do

02:07

it and we helped them launch editorial

02:10

publications to grow their own audience

02:12

generate their own revenue reduce their

02:14

reliance on platforms on programmatic in

02:16

seems nefarious right to speaking that

02:18

and saying that to a roomful of

02:19

publishers but on the backend we also

02:21

help publishers navigate these same sea

02:23

changes we help publishers create

02:25

creative Studios that allow them to

02:27

create the content on behalf of their

02:29

advertisers the brands that they work

02:31

with to be those inbound agencies that

02:33

Eric was talking about building that

02:34

within the publishing within their

02:36

publishing business themselves so we

02:38

work with we see it from both sides of

02:40

the coin but today what I really wanted

02:41

to focus on is the brand perspective we

02:43

work with a lot of brands that have a

02:44

lot of big budgets and I want to shift I

02:46

want to share with you a little bit

02:47

about how they're thinking how they're

02:48

planning how they're strategizing what

02:50

they're doing and how you could take

02:51

advantage of it am I talking as fast as

02:53

you work if you like to set a new record

02:55

I was like oh man I'll be sleepy one but

02:58

anyway so brief history of the attention

03:00

economy this is back in the day whenever

03:02

you had you know a TV maybe a newspaper

03:05

you had a family that was eight inches

03:06

from both or drinking coca-cola they're

03:08

having a good time this is when the

03:09

advertising business was beautiful there

03:11

were a few channels and people were

03:12

really rapidly attention being paid to

03:14

them and you could really guarantee that

03:16

hey if we put our message in those

03:17

channels they got no other choice are

03:18

they gonna go you know farm or do some I

03:21

don't know I don't have a joke there but

03:22

the point is audiences we're captive and

03:25

that's just not the way it is anymore

03:27

because this is the way that it is you

03:29

go to a concert nobody actually watches

03:31

a band play anymore they are

03:32

broadcasting it through snapchat or a

03:34

broadcaster through Instagram story

03:35

they're taking selfies there they're

03:38

choosing their own videos you nobody

03:39

looks at a sunset anymore they're

03:40

looking at potential Instagram likes and

03:43

all this to say that you know in the

03:44

1980s whenever they had those big

03:46

computers that like nineteen people

03:47

would would be in there and try and

03:48

fight the Soviets and try to get it all

03:50

the hack and everything like that there

03:51

was a room is probably about this big

03:52

that that amount of computing power is

03:55

actually in our smartphone smartphone is

03:57

is 13 thousand times more powerful than

04:00

those early computers and we have them

04:01

and we take a lot of selfies with them

04:02

point being the dynamics of influence

04:04

and information exchange have

04:05

fundamentally shifted and and we're just

04:08

trying to tread water in and stay afloat

04:11

in a business that feels like changes it

04:13

changes every single day so there's more

04:15

content out there than ever before

04:17

thanks to this thanks to these

04:18

supercomputers in our pockets literally

04:20

anything you can Google literally

04:21

anything and literally anything is

04:23

literally ten thousand ten million nine

04:26

hundred thousand results

04:27

that's actual that's an actual Google

04:30

search term there so in response look oh

04:32

my god everybody saturated with

04:33

messaging you see somebody messages

04:34

every single day how are we gonna

04:35

compete let's make more ads let's put an

04:37

ad on that egg let's put an ad on the

04:39

the turnstile let's put an ad on the

04:41

little thing that we put our shoes in

04:42

before we go through tsa so this was ten

04:44

years ago the New York Times published

04:45

this this this this headline that really

04:47

stuck with me anywhere the eye can see

04:49

it's likely to see an ad what does that

04:50

mean we start to tune them out right so

04:53

okay they're tuning them out let's make

04:54

them more annoying hey let's take over

04:56

your screen Eric who's talking about

04:57

this - let's make this ad be impossible

04:59

to close a stoop autoplay they're not

05:00

gonna play let's autoplay it for them

05:02

it's embarrass them and they're

05:03

incontinent sad whenever they are

05:04

walking around the office all these

05:06

different techniques is try and say hey

05:07

listen hey listen that's really what

05:10

they're trying to say I didn't expect

05:11

myself to shout but I just shout it to

05:12

try and make a point that we're getting

05:13

more annoying with our advertising so I

05:15

was just physically being more annoying

05:16

to you all to prove a point and people

05:18

are saying ok so attention Panzers it's

05:20

tension spans are shrinking let's make

05:22

our ads shorter let's make it one second

05:24

long and then we can say that we have

05:25

enough a lot of impressions and we

05:27

should be really happy about that truth

05:28

is that doesn't work either so I want to

05:31

introduce you the myth of the goldfish

05:33

how many people have heard that the

05:35

average person has the attention span of

05:37

a goldfish you heard that out there it's

05:38

about eight seconds my lady thank you so

05:41

much for making me feel like I'm not

05:41

ceiling when they knew that but people

05:43

say this all the time and marketers

05:45

think about this and they say oh my god

05:46

nobody's paying attention so we got to

05:47

do all of those things that I just

05:48

described in order to get into their

05:50

into their heads into their head space

05:51

and be relevant to them but those same

05:53

people that have the attention span of a

05:55

goldfish also will watch eight hours

05:58

plus on average of Netflix show that

05:59

they really really love so it makes you

06:02

think it's not really about being

06:03

shorter being louder be more intrusive

06:04

it's about being better advertising

06:07

needs to be better and that's what

06:08

brands are thinking about right now and

06:09

that's a huge opportunity for publishers

06:11

this has kind of always been the case

06:13

just the game has changed and made it

06:15

put more pressure on this sentiment that

06:16

Howard Gossage was one of the original

06:18

Mad Men said people don't read ads they

06:20

read would interest them sometimes it's

06:23

an ad most of the time it's not so the

06:26

premise here is what if ads actually

06:28

became as good as the content that

06:30

publishers are producing what if

06:32

advertising said hey we're not going to

06:33

be that annoying thing that interrupts

06:35

the thing we're going to be the thing

06:36

that attracts the person so Craig Davis

06:39

is another old

06:40

but it's a it's an oldie but a goodie we

06:41

need to stop interrupting what people

06:43

are interested in and become what people

06:44

are interested in there's a better way

06:48

to prove this point you have a question

06:49

for you does anybody know the most

06:51

clicked-on phrase in all of advertising

06:54

history click here that's optimistic

06:59

just click here it's here you can click

07:02

it back it's the truth it's really

07:09

that's really what we all know this

07:11

right you go to youtube and it's you

07:12

looking for that upper-right X you're

07:14

going looking for that ok four seconds

07:16

three seconds two seconds till I can

07:17

skip the ad I mean while the marketers

07:19

like wow I got him to watch for four

07:20

seconds you know they were waiting for

07:22

you to die so the point here is is that

07:26

people are skipping ads and it's not

07:28

just the physical clicking of the button

07:30

it's the banner blindness effect it's ad

07:32

blockers literally on their browsers all

07:34

of these things you know the mobile

07:35

experience is sort of reducing the right

07:37

rail where all that average you see good

07:39

advertising used to be the fact is is

07:41

we're up against this as a society as

07:43

publishers people are skipping

07:44

advertising and it's not resonating with

07:46

them so what do we need to do is we need

07:47

to change the game so let's meet today's

07:50

marketer he's only drinking as much as

07:52

Don Draper because it's hard out there

07:54

it wasn't like that joke you can read it

07:57

if you want to so anyway the idea here

07:59

is that today's marketer is really on

08:01

the hook for filling a lot of channels

08:03

with advertising or with content with

08:05

messaging or with communication we talk

08:06

about a fragmented media fragmented

08:08

media landscape marketers are trying to

08:10

figure out where is my audience spending

08:11

time and how can I be relevant in all of

08:13

these different channels how am I

08:14

supposed and should I focus on just a

08:16

couple of them they're overwhelmed

08:17

mentioned before Eric was even talking

08:19

about this all marketing needs to have a

08:21

return on investment used to be that

08:22

marketing they it's a cost center right

08:24

we're the fun guys we don't worry about

08:25

sales we do marketing it's wonderful

08:28

it's this fun thing we don't have to

08:29

worry about ROI that's changing most

08:31

brands especially the larger brands and

08:33

it'll trickle down into every niche

08:34

every sphere from B to C to B to B - B

08:38

to e people are looking for a return so

08:40

that marketing becomes a profit center

08:42

not across the cost center that's the

08:43

mandate from the c-suite and they're

08:45

looking for strategic partners that can

08:46

help them succeed Eric I'm quoting you

08:48

again Eric's did you have to go and ask

08:50

for it that permission to be the

08:52

strategic partner I'm gonna talk a

08:53

little bit about

08:53

how we help some publishers that we work

08:55

with do exactly that so this isn't new

09:00

right I think we all knew this that

09:01

advertising should be better that

09:03

advertising should add value Campbell

09:05

Soup has known this since 1968

09:06

how many of you have made or tasted or

09:09

had in your life a Campbell Soup recipe

09:11

like beyond this dang that's the mos

09:15

happy but the idea here is that even in

09:17

1968 they were saying listen we can brag

09:19

about ourselves and that's the only

09:21

that's gonna have a diminishing return

09:23

what we really want to do is add value

09:24

to your lives and if we can add value to

09:26

your lives we might earn your attention

09:28

we might earn your engagement that might

09:29

earn you as a customer to our soup so in

09:33

2016 Campbell's is still doing this and

09:35

they're still having great success with

09:36

it they partnered with BuzzFeed and said

09:38

instead of just a recipe there's a

09:39

billion recipes online it's a really

09:41

competitive space it's just like porn

09:43

another era guy was gonna throw out a

09:45

raunchy site just to throw you off and

09:47

if you're asking for it for but I don't

09:49

know any so I couldn't think of anything

09:51

that was the only problem so the idea

09:55

here is that some brands get this and

09:57

have always gotten this and it's in

09:59

their heritage but most brands are not

10:01

doing stuff like this but that's

10:02

changing I submit to you northwell

10:06

health this is a project that we're

10:07

actually working on with the largest

10:09

private employer in New York State an

10:11

eleven billion dollar company

10:13

they spent a strong percentage of that

10:15

on advertising or at least they did and

10:17

they're really starting to question the

10:18

return on their monthly insertion orders

10:20

the return on all of this advertising

10:23

banner ads print ads TV ads radio ads it

10:25

just sort of evaporates at the end of

10:26

the month and they get an impression

10:27

report and nothing else

10:28

so we're saying listen advertising can't

10:30

be an asset and a liability anymore it's

10:32

got to be an asset how do we get

10:34

long-term value out of our advertising

10:36

dollar so what are they doing they're

10:38

actually launching publications so the

10:40

well is a publication that we launched

10:42

for northwell and the idea here is we

10:43

could buy out all the space on health

10:45

com we could buy out all of the

10:47

targeting that Facebook has to offer

10:48

around health and wellness or we could

10:50

create a publication using journalists

10:53

to tell really impressive and profound

10:55

and amazing stories like this one what

10:58

cancer took and what cancer gave instead

11:00

of saying hey we have the best breast

11:01

cancer doctors in the world we're gonna

11:03

tell a story through photojournalism

11:05

about a woman who went through a double

11:07

mass

11:07

to me and had a profound lessons to

11:09

share on the other side of it that's

11:11

what they're spending on in lieu of

11:12

advertising the good news is they're

11:14

advertising this content and that's the

11:16

opportunity they're looking for

11:17

co-creators of this content and that's

11:18

the opportunity so just a quick look at

11:21

this the well by Northland you're gonna

11:22

see more and more of this happening has

11:25

anybody heard brands launching their own

11:26

content hubs content hub it sounds so

11:29

sexy a lot of them are doing a lot of

11:31

them are getting into experimenting with

11:32

their own branded content and what

11:34

they're finding is that you know so okay

11:37

this is like a time-lapse sequence I

11:38

planned it out launches health-focused

11:40

editorial site there they're sharing

11:43

their content it's resonating social

11:45

getting really really great responses

11:46

nobody really responds this well to

11:48

advertising what's happening is this

11:49

content used in advertising channels is

11:51

getting nine times the engagement at 120

11:53

at the price because it's performing

11:55

better because it's harder to ignore I

11:57

think that's a big opportunity that I'm

11:58

talking about just a second for

11:59

publishers to step into this space and

12:01

help the North wells of the world or the

12:03

North Wales of your niche do this

12:05

instead of them doing it on their own

12:06

that's an opportunity and that's the

12:10

last photo that I forgot and there's

12:11

more so it's good good feedback anyway

12:13

interest of time we'll move on into hot

12:15

dogs

12:15

fake hot dogs actually the idea here is

12:17

vegetarian hot dogs it's a frozen item

12:19

it's kind of a commodity it's not that

12:21

exciting

12:21

you could add you could advertise this

12:23

until you're blue in the face and people

12:25

aren't really gonna care that much about

12:27

how much your vegetarian hotdog is I'm

12:30

sorry Morningstar

12:31

but Morningstar got the memo and they

12:32

skated to where the puck was going they

12:33

said listen instead of just advertising

12:35

our price or the fact that we exist

12:37

why don't we invest in creating our own

12:39

documentaries about people who became

12:41

vegetarians from all different walks of

12:43

life maybe a butcher maybe somebody that

12:45

that went through a cancer scare and

12:48

decided to change their life so what

12:49

they did was they created a documentary

12:51

instead of advertising and they publish

12:53

it in all of these channels that you see

12:55

there below pretty scary right whenever

12:57

your business is largely dependent on

12:58

advertising even if you even a few

13:00

selling subscriptions even if you're

13:01

monetizing through e-commerce

13:02

advertising is a big chunk of the pie

13:04

and brands are kind of saying we can

13:06

create our own stories as opposed to

13:07

being just on their ad on a publication

13:12

sounds scary until you realize that

13:13

there's actually a huge opportunity here

13:15

and I keep alluding to it and I just

13:17

sort of want to walk you through that

13:18

the thinking here there's billions of

13:20

dollars being spent on content marketing

13:21

more and more ad advertising budgets are

13:25

going to con are going to go into

13:26

content even traditional campaigns are

13:28

going to be fueled with creative that is

13:30

content versus traditional advertising

13:33

two out of three marketers though

13:34

however are experimenting with native

13:36

but a lot of that a lot of those dollars

13:38

are going to platforms like Facebook and

13:40

like Google the big two that Eric was

13:42

talking about really glad you went be in

13:44

front of me let me set the stage nice

13:45

and well but basically here what we're

13:48

saying is that there's dollars being

13:49

spent and that's an opportunity for

13:51

publishers get up after those dollars so

13:53

I'll just walk you through sort of the

13:54

thinking the brands are investing in

13:56

content marketing

13:57

looks like articles it's videos it's

13:59

it's photos it's all these things

14:00

they're taking it to these places and

14:02

saying look good we created it and now

14:03

it's out there and most of them are

14:05

failing because they're going with

14:07

platforms are going to PR they're going

14:09

with agencies these people don't have

14:10

content in their heritage so what I

14:12

submit to you is that publishers should

14:14

be the ideal partner for any brand

14:16

that's investing in content marketing

14:18

whether they're running it on

14:19

advertising on your site or they're

14:21

running it on their own site and you

14:22

just happen to create for you for them

14:24

so if the industry and the currency of

14:27

advertising is completely changing from

14:29

promotional transactional to emotional

14:31

relationship building value adding then

14:33

then that's that's a sea change and most

14:36

publishers have sat on the sidelines and

14:38

let this happen let me ask you real

14:40

quick how many people are selling native

14:41

advertising right now to their and maybe

14:44

you guys aren't sellers but you're your

14:45

publication you're selling it one

14:46

selling native advertising all right

14:49

cool

14:49

how many people are getting interest

14:50

from their advertisers in native

14:52

advertising or something that's come up

14:53

how many know that the clients that you

14:55

have that maybe aren't doing native

14:57

advertising and producing a blog or a or

14:59

a series of white papers or they're

15:00

producing content in some way shape or

15:02

form many of them and cool that's scary

15:05

because doesn't that kind of cut

15:07

publishers out of the equation no

15:09

because this is an ancient proverb I

15:10

can't believe it's you know so many

15:12

years ago it's so many of the wisdom to

15:14

say this but native ads are actually the

15:17

gateway to this content marketing dollar

15:19

and and I think that that's something

15:22

that is really important for us to think

15:23

about because I think publishers are

15:25

well

15:25

ways to get those dollars in to build

15:27

these relationships so for those of you

15:28

that don't know native advertising

15:30

basically it's people say isn't that

15:32

just advertorial well it used to be

15:34

advertorial largely existed in print

15:37

Digital exposed native well I thought

15:41

you were really excited you give me two

15:42

hands up ten minutes

15:44

alright so Nick thank you James

15:47

so basically you know a quick example is

15:50

Netflix could could take out all sorts

15:52

of banner ads take out all sorts of

15:53

advertising to say we've got this new

15:55

series it's called oranges a new black

15:56

it's really really cool I bet you'll

15:58

like it but instead they partnered with

15:59

New York Times TV brand studio and they

16:01

said let's do a piece on women inmates

16:03

and women prisons and what those

16:04

conditions are like so they did this

16:06

story just like the New York Times would

16:07

have reported it they published it on

16:09

their site and they got a ton of

16:11

interest and people started to sharing

16:13

this ad because they were sharing an

16:14

article and so Netflix was able to get a

16:17

ton of people's radars full of oranges

16:19

and new black because they created

16:20

content with New York Times as opposed

16:22

to just you know being yet another

16:24

Netflix series that was going to go out

16:25

and ask for your time and your attention

16:27

so that's a great example of what native

16:29

advertising actually is and it looks a

16:30

bunch of different ways on a bunch of

16:32

different publications but really what

16:34

really the challenge is publishers like

16:37

I said before they get stuck on the

16:39

sidelines because publishers have

16:41

integrity and ethics and all that kind

16:43

of stuff you say like that's not our

16:45

business you know we're we're not a

16:47

slick agency we're not a creative shop

16:50

we're not we're not any of these things

16:52

that are on the left but these things on

16:54

the left not only do they represent big

16:55

dollars big investment dollars that that

16:58

CMOS are putting their money into or or

17:00

large there's large and small

17:01

organizations are putting their money

17:02

into but they also were the precursor to

17:05

what happens here so how many times you

17:07

get creative from an agency or from an

17:09

advertiser that you're that you're

17:11

selling to and they say okay here's our

17:13

creative put it on your site it gets a

17:15

bad click-through rate and then you say

17:16

oh your site must suck nothing to do

17:18

with my creative it's your site you get

17:20

blamed for a bad click-through rate

17:21

because they're creating stuff that you

17:23

had no part in in creating so what I'm

17:25

saying is that if you can position

17:27

yourself as we can help you with the

17:29

stuff on the Left you're going to have

17:31

better stuff number 9 content that will

17:33

actually work better in our channels and

17:35

in your channels and we can be your

17:37

partner in creating this new currency of

17:39

advertising

17:39

called content so why is this so

17:44

important for for publishers well I

17:46

actually think if you think about who

17:47

are the players in the market there's

17:49

publishers there's agencies and their

17:50

platforms gross oversimplification I

17:52

admit but if you think about it

17:54

platforms say hey we have distribution

17:55

Facebook can reach let's do it

17:58

Facebook can reach you in bizarre places

18:00

Facebook knows a lot they've got this

18:02

amazing enormous scale of audience that

18:04

can reach billions of people and they

18:06

have that audience data so they have

18:08

that but they don't know how to do

18:09

content and they don't know how to

18:10

create content they don't know that you

18:11

know the they don't have the editorial

18:13

soul that publishers have on the other

18:15

side of things the sleaziest guys in the

18:17

bunch which are agency say hey we know

18:19

audience data content we've been doing

18:21

at campaigns for years yeah we can do

18:23

content what's that like family availed

18:24

marketing brochures pretending to be

18:26

editorial but but but advertisers are

18:29

buying from agencies are buying from

18:30

content marketing agencies from Trish

18:32

channel advertising agencies who are

18:33

saying hey we know content too but what

18:35

I'm saying is that publishers actually

18:37

do have it all you've got this

18:38

triumvirate of we've got great audience

18:40

insight beyond even what Facebook knows

18:43

about I'm talking about that in a second

18:45

you've got a quality instinct you know

18:47

what's going to sit with your readers

18:48

and what's gonna bring the pitchforks

18:49

out with them and you have a trusted

18:51

reputation you have a platform that

18:53

isn't going to have unsavory things on

18:57

it your ad on your site is not never

18:59

going to be next to a Isis beheading

19:02

video or child pornography or a racist

19:05

rant because you have a controlled

19:07

environment I only bring those things up

19:08

not to be salacious but to be realistic

19:10

there's brands that are pulling out a

19:11

programmatic exchanges because they say

19:13

my Campbell's soup recipe is next to

19:15

what that doesn't happen in your

19:16

environment and that's an opportunity

19:18

people are pulling out of programmatic

19:20

they're looking for partners where they

19:21

have trusted environments that really

19:23

know an audience and can create the

19:25

content that gets that audience to care

19:26

I just wanted to have Wally have you

19:31

seen that movie he's such a sweet boy

19:32

let's love them but the point here is

19:35

it's just one idea I guess you could get

19:38

on some like existential thing about

19:39

like wall-e represents like publishing

19:41

and there's still hope but it looks

19:43

really bleak but I believe in wall-e I

19:44

believe in publishing but the idea here

19:46

is at the end of the day you're a broker

19:47

of trust you have an audience that trust

19:49

you you're creating editorial that has

19:51

you know credibility with them and

19:53

you've got a platform that is closed

19:55

that you own in your control so I think

19:57

the future of advertising may be content

20:00

but publishers are the ones that can

20:01

take advertisers to that future and very

20:04

quickly in summation this is a formula

20:07

for how I think you can do it and I said

20:09

before that we work with brands directly

20:11

we help them to think like a media

20:13

company build an audience like a media

20:15

company monetize like a media company

20:17

we also help media companies think like

20:19

a brand marketer and we do it this way

20:22

by saying we're gonna talk about our

20:24

audience insights in a different way

20:26

we're gonna offer quality editorial to

20:30

our advertisers so we're not so

20:31

dependent on their creative we can

20:32

actually get additional revenue by

20:34

creating the content we're gonna take a

20:35

consultative approach to sales so it's

20:37

not so much about you know a media kit

20:40

it's more about what can we do together

20:41

so some quick examples well that's cool

20:47

I didn't know that was animated I just

20:49

put a gif file up in the little logo

20:50

comes out so anyway American Chemical

20:52

Society has a publication called

20:53

chemical and engineering news anybody

20:55

anybody read that one no it's you do

20:57

it's for chemists for the smartest

20:59

people in the room so I'm not surprised

21:00

for chemists and engineers and what they

21:03

used to do was go to their advertisers

21:06

and say we've got rates dates in space

21:07

we've got a media kit we've got all

21:09

these ad products we've got all these

21:10

things all these places we even put your

21:11

message and that has a diminishing

21:13

returns effect because there's so many

21:15

other competitors so many other places

21:16

where the advertisers that chemours the

21:18

doubt the Dow Chemical of the world the

21:20

DuPont's of the world can get their

21:21

message out so the key thing that we did

21:24

with American Chemical Society say

21:26

listen agencies are taking these dollars

21:28

agencies are getting this money what if

21:29

you launch your own in-house studio

21:31

within C and en and called it's eme n

21:34

brand lab where instead of going from

21:36

media kit we're going to a strategic

21:37

partnership where we're saying step one

21:39

we need we need to know about you we

21:41

need to share audience insight with you

21:43

we need to we need to start this with by

21:45

tapping into our data and saying we know

21:47

a lot about this audience therefore

21:48

we're gonna start there we're gonna

21:49

share with you some insights about that

21:50

audience before we can talk about where

21:52

your ad is going to go step two we're

21:54

gonna create content for you

21:55

we know our readership we have the

21:56

analytics we have the history with them

21:58

we're gonna help you create content and

21:59

step three is we're gonna help you

22:00

distribute it it's going to start with

22:02

us it may exist on Facebook may exist on

22:04

our Facebook channels

22:05

and in social channels but really we're

22:07

gonna give you a targeted segmented

22:10

approach in distribution on our owned

22:12

properties so right out the gate you're

22:14

fundamentally shifting the conversation

22:16

from hey we've got a media kit it's like

22:18

it's basically the difference between

22:20

going to restaurant and saying you know

22:21

Cheesecake Factory for instance you've

22:23

been at Cheesecake Factory yeah that

22:25

like voluminous menu it's like 300 pages

22:27

it's kind of overwhelming you kind of

22:29

makes you lose your appetite difference

22:30

between seeing that and having a private

22:32

chef come up to me like what do you like

22:33

what's your favorite food what your

22:35

favorite ingredient I'll make that for

22:36

you

22:36

I can make that for you that's what

22:38

that's what smart publishers are doing

22:39

right now starting with the problem

22:41

saying we can help you solve this give

22:46

brands what Facebook can Facebook has a

22:49

lot of information I don't know if you

22:50

guys have heard this in the news but

22:51

Facebook has a lot of information on us

22:52

and it's intimidating because we we

22:55

don't want to sell head to head against

22:56

Facebook but what we can do is say

22:58

listen Facebook knows all this stuff and

23:00

can do audience segments and everything

23:01

like that but what we can do is actually

23:03

help interpret data we can create custom

23:05

studies and surveys and we can implement

23:07

campaigns on your behalf that Facebook

23:09

won't care about yeah you can do the

23:10

self-serve you know platform on Facebook

23:12

but what we can do is something custom

23:14

and so one of the some of the things

23:16

that you can do is we're gonna James am

23:18

I got like five minutes three minutes

23:19

two minutes all right

23:20

so going back to American Chemical

23:22

Society because I introduced them a

23:23

little bit ago one of the things that we

23:25

did was instead of going to media kits

23:26

we said we're gonna come to all of our

23:28

top 25 advertisers with a buying and

23:30

influencer study that says basically

23:31

here's how buyers and the b2b market of

23:34

chemists chemicals mass spectrometry

23:36

that was the only one I knew but it's a

23:38

really like complicated world and we're

23:41

going to show you we're going to show

23:42

you the year and the life of your of

23:45

your buyers because we're going to

23:46

survey them they trust us they'll

23:48

respond to our survey we're going to

23:49

come out instead of with a media kit

23:50

we're gonna come out with 10 slides on

23:52

trends about the chemistry market and

23:54

how you can capitalize them capitalize

23:56

on that as a as an advertiser developing

23:58

audience focus groups you know creating

24:00

frameworks and charts you're really

24:02

helping them think strategically about

24:03

you know their marketing whether they're

24:05

trying to earn awareness or they're

24:07

trying to educate people or they're

24:08

trying to get people to to say I'm going

24:11

from the shortlist so I'm going to

24:12

convert with you showing them frameworks

24:14

of how your audience thinks and what's

24:16

gonna what's really going to trigger

24:17

them at any any one of these touch

24:18

points

24:19

is a great way for you to shift from oh

24:20

there's that person that runs my

24:22

advertising sometimes - there's that

24:24

person that helps me plan my advertising

24:25

I always like to say that a hundred

24:27

percent of people want your audience

24:30

insights and a much lower percentage

24:31

want your advertising but if you lead

24:33

with your audience insights you're more

24:35

likely to get that advertising dollar

24:38

going back to north well the well that I

24:41

talked about before where they launched

24:42

their own editorial publication one of

24:44

the first things we did was an audience

24:45

study and we hired a research firm if

24:48

they had known or had a relationship

24:50

with a publisher we could have done that

24:51

with the publisher and that might have

24:53

fundamentally changed the way the well

24:54

went to market but instead we surveyed

24:56

an audience of women who were in a

24:59

certain geographic area who were making

25:00

healthcare decisions now it was great it

25:02

was that was the impetus for the entire

25:04

well strategy a publisher should have

25:07

brought that idea to them a publisher

25:08

should have been calling on northwell

25:09

and saying listen you don't know us but

25:12

here's what we can do we're gonna give

25:13

you a sample of what are the most

25:15

important things I'm thinking of like a

25:16

health com the most important things to

25:18

this audience is this that and the other

25:20

thing let's partner on how we can reach

25:22

them together so brands are invested in

25:24

this we talked about that chart where

25:25

where publishers get stuck this is that

25:27

very first one if you lead with research

25:29

as a sales is sort of like as a as a

25:32

piece of marketing collateral it can

25:33

lead to conversations that maybe you're

25:35

not having having right now number two

25:38

is helping brands extend their editorial

25:39

voice so there's a yeah so this is like

25:44

the kind of content that publishers can

25:46

produce and this is usually the kind of

25:48

content that brands produce you can kind

25:50

of see the difference so my point is

25:52

they create like it kind of looks like

25:54

it kind of feels like when you really

25:55

get close to it that's that's a cheap

25:57

version of it they struggle at

26:01

generating ideas Vic it's much easier to

26:03

get someone to work at a publishing

26:04

company than to be a marketing manager

26:06

at a brand they think about things brand

26:08

first versus audience first and they've

26:10

got outdated organizational charts that

26:12

don't allow them to produce content your

26:14

process is a sales tool for you for with

26:17

your advertisers by saying basically we

26:19

can we've got the talent we can create

26:21

ideas ideas are currency in this market

26:23

we have an audience lens we're not

26:25

thinking about your brand trust us it's

26:27

better if we think about your audience

26:27

and we can help you with the processes

26:29

of creating content and it's not going

26:31

to look like a little

26:32

friend here it's gonna look like that

26:33

guy handsome guy this is an example but

26:38

in the interest of time I will move

26:39

through it you kind of get the gist my

26:41

man so really if there's a advertiser in

26:45

your market who is now I love using this

26:48

pointer my dog doesn't like it though

26:50

made him pee in the house and he was

26:52

really well trained before that I'm not

26:55

gonna use that one the next time so if

26:57

they're doing a blog go to them and say

26:59

I read your blog it's pretty cool but

27:01

here's what I would do a little bit

27:02

differently and we'll offer that to you

27:04

for your blog but also why not try it as

27:06

a campaign and that campaign on our site

27:08

they're producing content their reason

27:10

their hand in saying I want to have a

27:11

different type of advertising out there

27:13

I'm doing it myself nobody's really

27:14

reading it you can say hey we can do it

27:16

with you we can do it for you and we bet

27:18

we can improve the readership and we've

27:19

got this distribution on guess what our

27:21

publications which have these great ad

27:23

with great relationships with audiences

27:25

we can expose that content actually to

27:27

the audience that you're trying to reach

27:28

and you have an asset you can put on

27:30

your own blog there are other bullet

27:33

points but I realize sure next you're

27:35

presenting it like a minute I'm two

27:39

minutes over I'm very I just want to be

27:40

respectful of his time and I forgot what

27:42

I was gonna say so the last point is is

27:46

a question I always like to think about

27:48

I always like to ask this one I don't

27:50

know why I keep saying I always do that

27:51

cuz I don't give this presentation a lot

27:52

but the point here is what can a

27:53

four-year-old ooh better than the

27:54

average media seller you could say I'm

27:56

not very rehearsed who said that yes

28:03

it's asking questions the point is that

28:05

like somewhere around I'm trying to hit

28:08

this thing I wish no she's very cute

28:11

though she's a friend of mine friend of

28:13

Mines kid but there's a certain point

28:15

asking questions

28:17

I got her permission to use the photo

28:22

at the age four we stop asking questions

28:24

this line goes down for the rest of our

28:26

lives and by the time you're a

28:27

professional age you're so knowledgeable

28:29

and you're so smart you're so worldly

28:31

that you don't need to ask questions

28:32

anymore you go in and you have the

28:33

solution for the advertiser well they

28:35

hate that studies even prove that what

28:38

can a sales represented representative

28:40

do to make your experience positive

28:41

first first first answer listen to my

28:45

needs second answer not too pushy third

28:47

answer provides relevant information and

28:49

that it gets to the basic ones responds

28:51

and gives information a timely manner

28:52

provide a range of options beyond their

28:54

business offering we're really listening

28:56

don't go in with an exclamation point go

28:58

in with a question mark it'll change the

28:59

conversations you're having it'll

29:01

broaden the opportunities you can get

29:02

with your advertisers so finally in the

29:05

consultative approach go in and study

29:07

your clients study your prospect what

29:08

are they publishing what are their pain

29:09

points what server wikipedia page say

29:10

what are their executives doing if

29:12

you're not doing this kind of homework

29:13

on every single sales call

29:14

you're gonna miss opportunities go for

29:16

an incremental buy and not a big close

29:18

it's about a lot of small victories end

29:20

up leading to a large relationship a lot

29:21

of these big advert of advertising deals

29:23

started with just a small campaign you

29:26

earn their trust then you say hey we can

29:27

be your partner in content creation we

29:28

can be your pawn and if you're your

29:29

partner in content creation and all of

29:31

advertising is moving toward content you

29:33

became their agency so that is the end

29:36

of the formula I kind of like petered

29:37

off there at the end I got distracted by

29:39

James but I really appreciate your time

29:41

and I hope you got some value out of

29:42

this and this is the formula for for

29:46

native advertising success in the world

29:48

of content marketing

29:48

wrap it up thank you guys so much

29:53

you